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By For Women, Inc.
April 09, 2019
Category: Women's Health
Tags: OBGYN   Birth Control   IUD  

What is an IUD?

IUDs are a form of birth control

An IUD (intra uterine device) is a temporary form of birth control for women. It is a small, plastic device that is implanted into the uterus by an OBGYN to prevent pregnancy.

How Does an IUD Work?

There are two different forms of the device - hormonal and copper. The device prevents pregnancy in several ways. The copper version prevents fertilization by targeting and killing the sperm. The hormonal version releases daily low levels of levonorgestrel, thickens the mucus produced by the cervix during ovulation and thins out the uterine lining, all of which prevent the sperm from fertilizing an egg.

Do IUDs Provide STD/STI Protection?

No. IUDs only offer protection from pregnancy, and will not protect against sexually transmitted diseases and infections. Discuss sexual activity and risk factors with your OBGYN to determine the best methods for protection and safe sex with an IUD.

Who is a Good Candidate for an Intra Uterine Device?

IUDs are safe and effective for both younger women in their teens and older women, and can be used whether or not a woman has already given birth.

Will an IUD Affect the Ability to Get Pregnant in the Future?

No. The device does not affect fertility, and the woman's ability to conceive will be the same as before the device was implanted once it is removed, according to the woman's age and individual fertility levels. Once a woman is ready to become pregnant, an OBGYN can help to establish a fertility chart to determine ovulation and the best time to conceive.

Is the Device Painful?

Some women, particularly those who have never had children, may experience some initial discomfort when it is first implanted. Over the counter pain killers like Advil or Motrin prior to insertion of the device can help to minimize any pain or discomfort during and immediately following implantation.

By For Women, Inc.
March 19, 2019
Category: Women's Health

If your OBGYN has recommended that you get a sonohysterogram done find out more about this procedure and what to expect.Sonohysterogram is performed when you don't have a menstrual cycle

Are you dealing with abnormal between-cycle bleeding, infertility or repeated miscarriages? While ultrasounds are often the first diagnostic test performed, if an ultrasound has come back normal and you’re still experiencing symptoms, then a gynecologist may recommend getting a sonohysterogram.

What can a sonohysterogram detect?

This procedure still uses an ultrasound to examine the inside of the uterus, but instead of just an ultrasound a saline solution is administered in the uterus beforehand. By injecting this solution inside the uterus we can obtain more details of the uterus that you wouldn’t be able to see with a regular ultrasound alone. A sonohysterogram can often be performed right in your gynecologist’s office and it usually takes about 15 minutes to complete.

When will a sonohysterogram be performed?

For obvious reasons this procedure will be performed when you don’t have your menstrual cycle, since bleeding could make it more difficult to see the uterus. This test isn’t performed on women who are pregnant or could be pregnant, as well as women with pelvic infections.

What should I expect from my procedure?

During the first portion of your treatment we will perform a regular transvaginal ultrasound. Then the solution will be injected into the uterus, and the ultrasound will be performed again.

After your procedure it is normal to experience some slight cramping and spotting, but most women are able to return to their normal activities the very same day as their procedure. But if you are having any symptoms that are concerning, you need to call your OBGYN.

If you are dealing with unusual uterine bleeding or having fertility issues, it’s certainly time to talk to a OBGYN specialist who can help provide you with the answers you need.

By For Women, Inc.
March 06, 2019
Category: Women's Health
Tags: Fibroids  

Affecting over 80 percent of women by the time they reach age 50, fibroids are abnormal uterine growths that can cause great discomfort, heavy periods, and abdominal pain. Luckily, there is a number of treatment options available to the millions of women who suffer from this condition. Read on to learn more about fibroids and how your local OBGYN can help ease your symptoms!

Fibroid Background

As mentioned above fibroids are typically non-cancerous tumors that develop within the uterine line. Although it is officially unclear on what exactly causes them to grow, experts generally agree that fibroid growth is influenced by a few factors, including hormone production, family history, a history of pregnancy, and being overweight.

While some people with fibroids report feeling no effect from their presence, other women report a range of different symptoms, such as:

  • Heavy and extended menstrual flow

  • Trouble conceiving

  • Pelvis and lower back pain

  • Frequent urination

  • Painful intercourse

  • Abdomen swelling

If you suspect that you may have fibroids, schedule an appointment with your local OBGYN to undergo a pelvic exam.

Treatment Options

Once your gynecologist has discovered the presence of fibroids, a specific treatment plan can be crafted specifically for you based on your age, your fibroid size, and the overall status of your health. Some possibilities for mild fibroids include:

  • Acupuncture

  • Yoga

  • Massage

  • Applying heat to the areas that are experiencing cramps

  • Losing weight, if you are overweight

  • Dietary changes, such as avoiding meat and high-calorie foods

For more serious cases, hormone regulating medications such as Lupron will cause your estrogen to drop, and thus cause menstrual cessation and fibroid shrinkage. If a patient’s fibroids are very large, a hysterectomy may even be in order.

Concerned? Give Us a Call!

If you suspect that you may have fibroids, don’t wait for the condition to get worse—contact your local gynecologist to seek relief and boost your health!

By For Women, Inc.
February 14, 2019
Category: Women's Health
Tags: Pap smear  

Why are Pap Smears Necessary?

If you are age 21 or older, you may be asked to get a pap smear. It’s also called a pap test, and it’s a common procedure used to test for cervical cancer in women. It is a routine procedure performed in the office during which cells are collected from your cervix.

Cervical cancer is a serious condition which often has no symptoms initially, until it’s in the later stages. A pap smear is a vital tool in detecting cervical cancer in the early stages, when treatment outcomes are much better. A pap smear can also find changes in your cervical cells which may indicate cancer developing at some point in the future.

When you reach age 21 or older, your doctor may recommend a pap test, usually performed along with a pelvic examination. In some cases, the pap test is combined with an HPV (human papillomavirus) which is a sexually transmitted condition known to cause cervical cancer.

The pap smear recommendations for healthy women are:

  • The first pap smear at age 21
  • A pap smear every 3 years if you are ages 21 to 65
  • A pap smear every 5 years if combined with an HPV test and you are age 30 or older

Having more frequent pap smears may be indicated if you have risk factors, including:

  • An HIV infection
  • An abnormal pap smear showing precancerous cells
  • A history of smoking
  • A weakened immune system due to organ transplant, chemotherapy, or corticosteroid use

To get ready for a pap smear, there are certain guidelines you should follow. Remember to:

  • Avoid having sexual intercourse, using a douche, or any vaginal medications or spermicidal products including foams, creams, or gels for at least 2 days before your test.
  • Avoid scheduling a pap smear during your menstrual period

A pap smear is a necessary part of protecting women’s health. The test is important because it is the only definitive way to diagnose cervical cancer in the early stages. Early diagnosis is critical to early treatment, which can lead to a better outcome for you.

By For Women, Inc.
February 05, 2019
Category: Women's Health

Treating Irregular Periods

Irregular periods are common when you first start menstruating. It’s common for them to be early or late, but as you get older, your menstrual cycle should become more regular, with the average length of the cycle lasting 28 days.

You have chronic irregular periods if:

  • The length of your menstrual cycle keeps changing
  • Your periods are coming early or late
  • You experience severe abdominal pain and very heavy bleeding during your period

There are many causes of irregular periods, including:

  • Puberty, pregnancy, or menopause
  • Contraceptive measures including the pill or intrauterine device
  • Extreme weight fluctuations, excessive exercise, or stress
  • Medical conditions including thyroid issues, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or polycystic ovary syndrome

You should see a doctor if:

  • Your periods are suddenly irregular and you are under age 45
  • Your periods are more frequent than 21 days
  • Your periods are less frequent than 35 days
  • Your periods last longer than 7 days
  • You have severe abdominal pain and heavy bleeding with your periods
  • You are trying to have a baby, but you have irregular periods

There are several ways to treat irregular menstruation. The first step is determining what is causing it. If it is due to a medical issue like thyroid problems, medication or treatment of the underlying condition is vital. Additional treatment measures include:

  • Losing weight, if irregular menstruation is due to being overweight
  • Hormonal therapies, including birth control to regulate menstruation
  • Surgical therapy, if irregular menstruation is due to uterine fibroids or other structural issue.

There is also a 5-year intrauterine device known as Mirena, which can lessen bleeding. It also works as a contraceptive. Your doctor can help you decide which treatment option is best for you.

Irregular menstruation may be self-limiting, but it may go on for months or years. It can affect your life, especially if you are trying to get pregnant. It can also be a sign of a serious underlying condition. It’s important to seek out your doctor to find the cause, protect your health, and give you peace-of-mind.





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